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Asperger's School Columbus / Asperger's Program in Columbus

Aspergers school aspergers program Columbus.
To date, the ASPIRE Asperger’s Program is the best replication of the Morningside Model.

Asperger's School Columbus / Asperger's Program in Columbus Overview

The ASPIRE Asperger’s Program uses a behavior-analytic approach, along with empirically researched curriculum and technologies, to generate dynamic growth in students ages 7-22.

Students enrolled in the program are grouped by age (within three years of IEP-identified grade level) and by their placement assessments in the three core areas--Reading, Writing and Math. Mastery in these subjects is the focus of the ASPIRE Asperger’s Program. Instructionally, the program is a replication of the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction (The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction: What It Means to Leave No Child Behind, Johnson, K., Street, E. www.morningsideacadeny.org).

Mastery in these subjects is the focus of the ASPIRE Asperger’s Program.

To date, the ASPIRE Asperger’s Program is the best replication of the Morningside Model and the only replication which works exclusively with students on the ASD spectrum.  

Aspergers school, Aspergers program Columbus.

How It Works

During the intake process, students are placed in homogenous instructional groups with similarly-skilled peers.

Based on Curriculum-Based Placement Tests, various fluency probes, and Tier III assessments from Haugland's 3-Tier assessment battery such as the WJ-IV, Placement coordinators work with previous teachers to find placements for students that will also benefit them socially and behaviorally.  

Asperger's School Columbus
Whether it is social or academic behavior, our approach is to teach students the appropriate behaviors.

Behavior Management

Behavior management in the program is consistent with the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis. Haugland does not use punishment procedures, but rather rewards.

Behavior Management (Cont.)

For instance, students engage in a token economy system called the Kroner Bank. In each class, students earn points for following expectations set by their teacher and for the display of positive and appropriate behavior.

These points can be redeemed for tangible items in our school store, reward minutes on classroom computers or in our Game Room, or for many other potential rewards.

Whether it is social or academic behavior, our approach is to teach students the appropriate behaviors and then reward them for displaying those behaviors.

Many students struggle in other education settings due to a fundamental lack of learning skills.

Examples of the learning skills that we focus on in the ASPIRE Asperger's program:

  •   How to follow directions.
  •   How to attend to the teacher.
  •   How to organize oneself for success.
  •   How to be self-critical.
  •   How to give feedback to peers appropriately.
  •   How to receive feedback from peers and teachers appropriately.

Whether it is social or academic behavior, our approach is to teach students the appropriate behaviors and then reward them for displaying those behaviors.

Classroom teachers use the first few weeks of the year to teach the classroom procedures and learning skills necessary to be successful learners.

By spending time on these skills that are oftentimes assumed to be known, our classrooms are able to move at a faster pace than most classrooms.  

Asperger's School Columbus

Creating Generative Learners

The Morningside Model of Generative Instruction, which ASPIRE replicates, uses Mathetics, Direct Instruction, Precision Teaching and other technologies to develop "generative learners."

Since we are unable to teach each student every possible skill that they will need in life, we need to focus on teaching them how to be independent, engaged, and fluent, lifelong learners.

A unique element of the ASPIRE Asperger’s Program is its usage of teacher coaches. Empirical studies show that teachers who regularly receive coaching demonstrate higher rates of skill retention and application.

we need to focus on teaching them how to be independent, engaged, and fluent, lifelong learners.

Our teachers are coached as often as 1-5 times per week. Some examples of areas where coaches work with teachers are:

  •   Making instructional processes more efficient.
  •   Making instructional delivery more effective.
  •   Making good instructional decisions.
  •   Managing and teaching classroom behaviors.